Help & Advice

Practical advice and assistance in emergencies

Badgers face many threats, from road traffic collisions, illegal persecution and snares to becoming trapped or injured on building sites.

Lancashire Badger Group has trained volunteers who will be able to provide advice over the phone or collect injured or trapped badgers.



Road Traffic Collisions
It has been estimated that up to 50,000 badgers may be killed on our roads each year. If safe to do so, it is worth checking what appears to be a dead badger.
Help
If you find an injured badger, please contact the RSPCA emergency line (0300 1234 999). We may be able to provide support or advice to their officers. Do not approach the animal as it will be under stress and may bite or run. Wait and watch from a distance. If you can safely warn other road users of any obstruction please do so, but do not put yourself at any risk.
Advice
If the badger moves away, try to follow at a safe distance but don’t try to stop it. It’s important that someone stays if possible to guide rescuers to the badger’s location. The RSPCA is unable to send officers to an animal if they do not know it is still at the scene. If we cannot find it, we can’t help it. If you cannot stay, make a detailed note of the location and ensure the contact is aware.
Snares
If you find a badger in a snare DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE IT.
Help
Snares can do serious damage to skin tissue which is not immediately obvious. If a badger does not receive treatment and monitoring over a period of several days, it may die. Please do not release the animal by cutting the snare as the badger will go to ground and we will not be able to help or provide treatment.
Advice
Please DO contact the RSPCA emergency line (0300 1234 999) or our emergency line (08448 707908 – option 1) if they cannot help. Cover the animal with a coat to keep it warm and calm. Stay nearby so that you can help rescuers to find it. For more information on snares visit our crime page.
Cubs
Badger cubs begin to explore above ground in May, sometimes without mum’s permission! Unless the cub is very young, there is a good chance that they are perfectly fine.
Help
Badger cubs begin to explore above ground in May, sometimes without mum’s permission! Unless the cub is very young, there is a good chance that they are perfectly fine. We would always advise you to watch the cub(s) from a distance to see if there is anything concerning (obvious limp or unsteady). If they are showing signs of being injured or unwell then call for help.
Advice
Badger cubs begin to explore above ground in May, sometimes without mum’s permission! Unless the cub is very young, there is a good chance that they are perfectly fine. We would always advise you to watch the cub(s) from a distance to see if there is anything concerning (obvious limp or unsteady). If they are showing signs of being injured or unwell then call for help.
Other Emergencies
If you find an injured or trapped badger in any other location please contact the RSPCA on 0300 1234 999) or our emergency line (08448 707908 – option 1) if they cannot help.
Help
If you find an injured or trapped badger in any other location please contact the RSPCA on 0300 1234 999) or our emergency line (08448 707908 – option 1) if they cannot help. Try not to cause the animal alarm, but observe from a distance. If you are unsure whether a badger is injured but you have found it out during the daytime or in an unusual location, do not hesitate to call for advice.
Advice
If you are in doubt at any time, call us for advice. Without members of the public who care, acting as our eyes and ears we wouldn’t be able to help our beautiful badgers.